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Articles by Graham Womack

Graham Womack is founder and editor of Baseball: Past and Present and a member of the Society for American Baseball Research. Email him at thewomack@gmail.com.

Historian's Corner

Vida Blue and the Unexpectedly Tight
1971 American League Cy Young Race

On July 25, 1971, Vida Blue was on top of baseball.

Three days shy of his 22nd birthday, the Oakland Athletics’ ace had electrified the Majors by going 18–3 with a 1.41 ERA to this point in the season. He would win that day, on the road against the Detroit Tigers, dropping his ERA to 1.37 and giving him a chance to become just the second pitcher since 1935 to win at least 30 games in a season.

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Historian's Corner

How a BBWAA Dispute Helped Jackie Robinson
Win the Inaugural Rookie of the Year Award

On January 1, 1947, The Sporting News made note of the Chicago chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America’s voting 27-year-old Cubs first baseman Eddie Waitkus baseball’s Rookie of the Year for 1946.

Waitkus—whose greatest claim to fame would come two years later when a deranged female admirer shot him, helping inspire the plot of The Natural—had hit .304 for the Cubs.

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Historian's Corner

The Very First Induction Day and the Cavalcade of Baseball at Cooperstown

On June 12, 1939, dedication day finally arrived for the Baseball Hall of Fame. It had been five years since Alexander Cleland hatched the idea for a baseball museum on a trip to Cooperstown; 22 years since a group of men in an Ilion, New York, cigar store launched a fund to build a memorial to baseball’s supposed founder Abner Doubleday; and 36 years since then-National League President Harry Pulliam opened a private hall of fame in his New York offices.

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Historian's Corner

Alexander Cleland: Little-Known Force Behind the Founding of Cooperstown

In 1987, baseball was two years from celebrating both the 50th anniversary of the Hall of Fame’s 1939 dedication and the 150th anniversary of the game’s purported, though widely discredited, founding in Cooperstown, New York. Four popular baseball films—Eight Men Out, Bull Durham, Field of Dreams, and Major League—would come out by 1989, with the myth of Cooperstown stoking box office demand.

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Historian's Corner

A Memorial to Mythical Founder Abner Doubleday Lays the Groundwork for the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown

In the first few pages of his 1994 book, The Politics of Glory, Bill James focused on the Clark family of the Singer sewing machine fortune, their administrator Alexander Cleland, and then-National League President Ford Frick as driving forces in getting the Hall of Fame and its accompanying museum built.

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Historian's Corner

The Doubleday Myth and
Honoring Excellence in the Years before Cooperstown

Baseball is too venerable and too vigorous an institution to not have a permanent hall of fame.”

I. E. Sanborn, Pittsburgh Press, February 14, 1915

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Historian's Corner

The Neverending Refrain:
Player Salaries and Major League Baseball

Near the end of the 1876 season, former Cincinnati Red Stockings Manager John Joyce gave an interview to the Chicago Tribune. It was the first year of the National League. Perhaps Joyce, a wealthy Ohioan who’d revived the Cincinnati club that year, faced precarious times.

“I think high salaries will kill the sport ultimately,” Joyce said in an interview printed on August 6, 1876.

“How so?” the writer asked.

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Historian's Corner

The Forgotten Reign of Vean Gregg

On October 13, 1913, a pitcher few fans today would know of pitched one of the greatest games that won’t easily be found in any record book.

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Historian's Corner

When Babe Ruth Pitched Again

In 1919, as goes his story from The Glory of Their Times, Boston Red Sox outfielder Harry Hooper made one of the boldest moves in baseball history, convincing General Manager Ed Barrow to put teammate Babe Ruth in the field everyday.

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