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Articles by Graham Womack

Graham Womack is founder and editor of Baseball: Past and Present and a member of the Society for American Baseball Research. Email him at thewomack@gmail.com.

Historian's Corner

A Memorial to Mythical Founder Abner Doubleday Lays the Groundwork for the Hall of Fame at Cooperstown

In the first few pages of his 1994 book, The Politics of Glory, Bill James focused on the Clark family of the Singer sewing machine fortune, their administrator Alexander Cleland, and then-National League President Ford Frick as driving forces in getting the Hall of Fame and its accompanying museum built.

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Historian's Corner

The Doubleday Myth and
Honoring Excellence in the Years before Cooperstown

Baseball is too venerable and too vigorous an institution to not have a permanent hall of fame.”

I. E. Sanborn, Pittsburgh Press, February 14, 1915

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Historian's Corner

The Neverending Refrain:
Player Salaries and Major League Baseball

Near the end of the 1876 season, former Cincinnati Red Stockings Manager John Joyce gave an interview to the Chicago Tribune. It was the first year of the National League. Perhaps Joyce, a wealthy Ohioan who’d revived the Cincinnati club that year, faced precarious times.

“I think high salaries will kill the sport ultimately,” Joyce said in an interview printed on August 6, 1876.

“How so?” the writer asked.

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Historian's Corner

The Forgotten Reign of Vean Gregg

On October 13, 1913, a pitcher few fans today would know of pitched one of the greatest games that won’t easily be found in any record book.

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Historian's Corner

When Babe Ruth Pitched Again

In 1919, as goes his story from The Glory of Their Times, Boston Red Sox outfielder Harry Hooper made one of the boldest moves in baseball history, convincing General Manager Ed Barrow to put teammate Babe Ruth in the field everyday.

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Historian's Corner

Home Early: The Unusual Story of Jim Derrington, Dave Skaugstad, and Alex George

When Joe Nuxhall made his Major League Baseball debut in 1944 at age 15, getting battered for five runs in two-thirds of an inning in relief, there was a silver lining.

It took eight years but Nuxhall returned to the Majors, making two All-Star appearances, winning 135 games, and pitching until 1966. Nuxhall remains the youngest player in modern MLB history, and, of course, this headlined his New York Times obituary in 2007. But it was far from his greatest achievement.

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Historian's Corner

Pat Scantlebury, the Ancient Rookie

In a more just world, Pat Scantlebury would have been in the Majors a long time before he finally debuted for the Cincinnati Reds on April 19, 1956, at the age of 38 years, 160 days.

The 10th oldest Major League Baseball rookie at the time of debut since 1900, according to Baseball-reference.com, Scantlebury had pitched in the Negro Leagues and minors since 1944. Prior to that, he pitched in his native Panama, one of two players in MLB history along with Rod Carew to come from the Canal Zone.

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Historian's Corner

Patsy Tebeau, the Manager Who Walked Away

When Patsy Tebeau resigned as player-manager of the St. Louis Cardinals in August 1900, it was probably clear he had to go. The team had future Hall of Fame Managers John McGraw and Wilbert Robinson on its playing roster and had stumbled to a 42–50 record. Tebeau had a reputation as one of the toughest players of the 1890s, but he’d become lax with his charges.

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Historian's Corner

The Rise and Fall of Gus Greenlee

On the evening of July 19, 1938, the stockholders of Greenlee Field met to consider an offer. The first black-owned ballpark in Negro League history was six years old, a Hill District marquee, and home to one of baseball’s greatest teams, the Pittsburgh Crawfords. The city’s Housing Authority, which wanted the land for a low-income residential project, was offering $50,000. Construction of the 8,000-seat park had cost at least twice that. But the city had condemnation power.

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