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Articles by Bob Klapisch

Bob Klapisch has been covering baseball in New York for almost 30 years. Writing for the New York Post, New York Daily News and most recently the The Record. He is also a regular contributor for ESPN.com and FoxSports.com. He has been a voting member of the Baseball Writers Association of America since 1983.

Historian's Corner

Watching History in Real Time: The 2016 Chicago Cubs

I’m only half-kidding when I say I’ve been covering baseball since the Paleozoic Age; it just feels that way sometimes. Nevertheless, decades of my professional life have been spent in the press box, which makes historical comparisons credible, if not easy. So when I’m asked about the best postseason run I’ve ever covered, I draw on an archive that includes the ’86 New York Mets, the ’91 Minnesota Twins, the ’96 New York Yankees, and the ’04 Boston Red Sox.

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Historian's Corner

Eddie Murray: The Quiet Man With the Deadly Bat

It was early in spring training 25 years ago when New York Mets General Manager Al Harazin summoned the beat writers to his office for a friendly word of advice. Actually, the message wasn’t so friendly and the advice was closer to a warning. But Harazin’s point couldn’t have been clearer: Watch your step with Eddie Murray, the free-agent first baseman who had been signed by the team over the winter.

“Eddie doesn’t suffer fools gladly,” Harazin said. “I’ll leave it at that.”

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Historian's Corner

The 1956 World Series: The End of an Era (and a Rivalry)

The year was 1954, when anyone paying close attention might’ve realized the Dodgers had their eye on the door, ready to leave Brooklyn. Not that team president Peter O’Malley came out and said so, but in retrospect the hints were everywhere.

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Historian's Corner

The Lost Art of Arguing With an Umpire

If you want to know what baseball was like in its low-tech, pre-PC days, run a Google search on Earl Weaver going nuclear on a hapless umpire. You can get the same result if you look up Billy Martin or Tommy Lasorda, but Weaver was the king of in-your-face diplomacy. Feigned or not, you just don’t see theater like that anymore.

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Historian's Corner

The Greatest World Series Game Ever

Any self-respecting Mets fan will fix a gaze that’ll cut you in two at the mere mention of 1988. That’s how much it (still) hurts to think of the NL Championship Series loss to the Dodgers, the team the Mets had beaten 11 times in the regular season and represented nothing more than calisthenics on the way to the World Series.

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Historian's Corner

How the Mets Are Reclaiming New York from the Yankees

Several years ago, I was spending time with Yogi Berra at his Museum and Learning Center in Montclair, N.J. Yogi was still vibrant and in good health, and on this day, he was eager to walk me through his own time tunnel.

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Historian's Corner

Why Fastball Velocities Keep Rising

It wasn’t long ago that I saw an ad for the Dodge Challenger Hellcat, which boasted a near-impossible 707 horsepower. My first and only thought about this car was—impossible. But I did my research and realized Dodge’s engineers had indeed made a breakthrough. They’d created the fastest production muscle car in American history, a four-wheel rocket ship.

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Historian's Corner

Why Baseball Is Not Dying

There’s probably no way to count the number of times baseball has been pronounced dead—or at least dying—in the last 50 years. Too slow, too boring, too out of touch with younger fans who need more simulation. Think any of this is new? Try again.

In 1957, the Dodgers’ last year in Brooklyn, attendance fell by 20 percent. This, despite the fact they’d won the pennant the previous season and were only two years removed from beating the hated Yankees in the World Series.

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Historian's Corner

How Would Babe Ruth Fare in 2016?

How would Babe Ruth handle Clayton Kershaw’s curveball? That thought occurred to me during the NL Division Series, when I found myself gawking at the ferocity of that oversized hook. Could Ruth and his 42-ounce bat really hold his own against Kershaw or Matt Harvey’s slider or Aroldis Chapman’s fastball?

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