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Articles by Bill Nowlin

Bill Nowlin is author of more than 40 books, most of them Red Sox-related. He’s written several books on Ted Williams, including Ted Williams at War and 521: The Story of Ted Williams’ Home Runs. A co-founder of Rounder Records, Bill still lives within five miles of Fenway Park.

Historian's Corner

The 1917 World Series

Both teams dominated their respective leagues in the regular season—the White Sox by nine games and the Giants by 10 games. The World Series opened at Chicago’s Comiskey Park on Saturday, October 6. The pitchers were knuckleballer Eddie Cicotte for Chicago and Slim Sallee for New York, though as was often the custom at the time, the identities of the starters were kept secret as long as possible.

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Historian's Corner

How the 1917 Season Unfolded

In 1916, John McGraw’s New York Giants had finished in fourth place, but they dominated in 1917. Only the Cincinnati Reds gave them trouble in head-to-head matchups, both teams winning 11 games. All the way through June, however, the Giants had to fight to maintain first place. Only once (on May 17) did they have a lead as large as three games. On 10 days they were tied for first, but most of the time they were in second place—though very close (some 14 days saw them in second by only half a game).

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Historian's Corner

I Wrote Ted Williams’s Last Words

Ted Williams was my hero as I grew up a Red Sox fan in Greater Boston.

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Historian's Corner

The Boston Red Sox—The Depressing Years

Coming off a decade when the Boston Red Sox won four world championships in a seven-year stretch (1912, 1915, 1916, and 1918), the Sox entered the 1920s never having been beaten for a World Series title. With their win in the first World Series ever played (1903) and the 1904 season when the National League’s New York Giants refused to play them in the postseason, they’d been a dynasty.

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Historian's Corner

Reverend Doctor Crew Chief Ted Barrett, Major League Umpire

Umpires appropriately prefer to stay out of the limelight. The game is, after all, not about them. They are rarely recognized as they arrive at the ballpark maybe 90 minutes before game time.

During an interview with Ted Barrett and his crew during a visit to officiate a series between the Seattle Mariners and Boston Red Sox, it came out that Barrett was one of a select number of umpires who have earned advanced degrees.

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Historian's Corner

The Perils of Peaking Too Early in the Quest for the Pennant

With World War II over, all the ballplayers who had been in military service (and who were able) returned to their various teams. For the 1946 Boston Red Sox, that meant players such as Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, and Tex Hughson, to name a few. After four years of war, fans were ready for baseball without battle news dominating the front pages.

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Historian's Corner

Ted Williams Cheers Up a Young Amputee

Throughout the history of baseball, there are recurrent myths and legends, and heartwarming stories, too. Many of them are even true.

Cynicism aside, it really does make us feel good when we read about a ballplayer who visits a child dying of cancer, a star who brightens the day of a family enveloped by gloom.

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Historian's Corner

Jim Zapp

Jim “Zipper” Zapp played a big role in getting the Birmingham Black Barons to the 1948 World Series against the Homestead Grays—the last time there was a World Series in the Negro Leagues. The season had seen a young rookie named Willie Mays spell him in the second game of a doubleheader. Zapp was a big right-handed outfielder, standing 6 feet, 2 or 3 inches and weighing 215 to 230 pounds.

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Historian's Corner

How Sam Jethroe Was Received in Boston

My interest in Sam Jethroe sprang from my ongoing documentation of the history of the Boston Red Sox. Most students of baseball history know that the Red Sox were the last team in the Major Leagues to desegregate. That came in 1959, when the Red Sox finally bowed to overwhelming pressure and promoted Pumpsie Green to the big leagues in the middle of the 1959 season.

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