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Articles by Paul Dickson

Paul Dickson is the author of more than 60 books and several hundred magazine and newspaper articles. He has written over a dozen bat and ball books (11 on baseball and one on softball). His most recent is the biography, Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick. It was named the 2012 CASEY Award for Best Baseball Book of the Year. In 2011 Paul was awarded the Tony Salin Memorial Award from the Baseball Reliquary for the preservation of baseball history. He was also honored in 2008 by the New York Public Library for his award-winning and widely acclaimed Dickson Baseball Dictionary, now in its third edition.

Historian's Corner

The First All-Star Game: Babe Ruth Prevails

On July 6, 1933, 47,595 fans packed into Comiskey Park, where some of baseball’s historic moments had taken place—including four games of the infamous nine-game 1919 “Black Sox” World Series.

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Historian's Corner

The Game of the Century:
Major League Baseball Agrees to an All-Star Game

The most enduring baseball custom to emerge during the Great Depression—the midseason All-Star Game between the American and National Leagues—was the brainchild of several individuals with no direct connection to baseball.

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Historian's Corner

Baseball Hits Rock Bottom in the Early 1930s

The effect of the Great Depression on baseball was a severe decrease in attendance and a loss of revenue. People simply had less money available for anything other than food and shelter, and for many Americans, baseball games were a luxury that could no longer be afforded. Americans, and not just the working class, were suddenly more likely to be found in a bread line than a reserved seat at a baseball game.

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Historian's Corner

The Tragic Death of Addie Joss
and MLB’s First Collection of All-Stars

The use of the word star to refer to a human being rather than a celestial body dates back to 1824 when it was first used to describe the lead actor in a play. After the Civil War, the term was adopted by Vaudeville, where all the headliners were deemed to be stars. The term came to baseball around 1890 when it was used to describe Cap Anson, who led the National League (there was only one league at that time) with 78 RBIs for the Chicago White Stockings. Chicago won the pennant in 1890 with a 67–17 record, 44 games ahead of the last-place Cincinnati Reds.

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Historian's Corner

A Tribute to Joe Garagiola in His Own Words

When Joe Garagiola died on March 23, 2016, at the age of 90, his many obituary writers were torn between two choices when writing their lead: was he a baseball player who later became a major television personality, or was he a television star who also played Major League baseball? It was a classic toss-up and the kind of dilemma that Garagiola himself would have found worthy of a quick self-effacing remark.

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Historian's Corner

Homage to Vin Scully

What baseball is to America, Scully is to baseball.”
—Doug Gamble, Orange County Register

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Historian's Corner

Stengelese

July 30, 2016, marks the 126th anniversary of the birth of Casey Stengel, one of the truly legendary baseball figures of the twentieth century. First as a player and then as a manager, he was known as much for his ability as a baseball man as for Stengelese, the vocabulary and implausible brand of double talk that came out of his mouth. Red Smith once likened trying to understand Casey to “picking up quicksilver with boxing gloves.”

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Historian's Corner

Celebrating Ted Williams’s Historic Call for Inclusion 50 Years Ago This Week

In late 1965, in advance of his first year of eligibility, Ted Williams was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame with 282 out of a possible 302 votes. He needed 227 for election. He received 93.4 percent of the votes cast by members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, making him just the eighth player elected on his first appearance on the ballot.

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Historian's Corner

1939—The Beginning of Baseball’s Modern Era and the Eruption of the Volcano Manager

Having been born in 1939 into a family with a healthy baseball obsession, I have long been fascinated with that baseball season, not only because it was my own rookie year here on the planet, but also because it signaled the end of one baseball era and the beginning of another—the end of baseball’s Ruthian Golden Age and the beginning of what folks around my age long ago decided to call the Modern Era.

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