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Articles by Lawrence Hogan

Dr. Lawrence Hogan, a senior professor of history at Union County College served as a director of Out Of The Shadows, a study of the history of African Americans in baseball sponsored by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the Office of the Commissioner of Major League Baseball. That groundbreaking initiative contributed to the election in 2006 of 17 pre-Negro League and Negro League players and executives to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. In January 2006 National Geographic and the Hall of Fame published Shades of Glory: The Negro Leagues and the Story of African-American Baseball, for which he was author and coordinating editor. Shades of Glory has been called a definitive history of African Americans in baseball. To be published in 2013 by ABC Clio/Praeger is his The Forgotten History of African-American Baseball: Slavery Times, Jim Crow, Negro Leagues. His So Many Seasons in the Sun: A Century and More of Conversation with Baseball’s Greatest Clubhouse Managers was released early in 2013.

 

 

Historian's Corner

Let’s Win This One for Murph

Miguel Angel “Murph” Murphy
San Francisco Giants Bat Boy, 1958–1959
Clubhouse Assistant Manager, 1960–1979
Clubhouse Manager, 1980–2014
Senior Advisor, 2015-Present

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Historian's Corner

"Inside Dope, Though Few Know It"

Who would ever want to take a journey to several Midwestern prisons during the 1920s? Surprisingly, the answer is a real baseball fan.

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Historian's Corner

John Montgomery Ward and Fred Logan: Under Appreciated Baseball Men

Fred Logan is one of the longest serving clubhouse managers in the history of Major League Baseball. Beginning in 1889 he served the New York Giants, and after 1903 the Highlanders/Yankees through the 1946 season. Little did Logan—as an 11-year-old baseball-loving youngster “hanging around the Polo Grounds as a lad”—realize what was in store for him one afternoon toward the middle of the 1889 season when Giants star shortstop John Montgomery Ward shouted to him.

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Historian's Corner

A Latin American Bird Dog

When I met “Murph” for the first time I had no idea I was also “meeting” the greatest scout in the history of our National Pastime. “Murph” is Mike Murphy, long serving and legendary clubhouse manager of the San Francisco Giants. I first met “Murph” – christened Miguel Angel I came to learn – in Arizona several springs ago on a personal journey for me into the darker side of baseball’s history. I was serving as a director of the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s OUT OF THE SHADOWS project on the history of blacks in baseball.

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Historian's Corner

New York Chapter of the Emerald Age of Baseball: The 1905 World Series and the Irish Giants

In nineteenth-century New York City, politics and baseball would prove to be Irish games.

The political club Tammany Hall, which is inseparably linked with the emergence of the Irish as a potent force in American politics, was at the center of New York City Democratic politics. (Could there be any other kind for the pioneering generation of immigrants from the Emerald Isle?)

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Historian's Corner

Baseball in Slavery Times

The always-provocative and challenging Albert Murray tells us that it is important we understand how we view—actually too frequently miss view—the history of slavery. He holds that the experience of slavery in the United States is far too complex to simply see it as a time when a stigma was attached to its victims that carried into freedom times. Murray notes that

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Historian's Corner

What Happened After Jackie

When it comes to telling the story of the integration of baseball, “Never mind Jackie Robinson?” Time out. That sounds like heresy.

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Historian's Corner

The First Black World Series

Entering the 1923 Negro Leagues season, there had never been a true Negro World Series. Before there could be such there needed to be rival Negro Major Leagues. As the 1923 season progressed with a real league operating in the East for the first time, and in the West the Negro National League enjoying its fourth season of play, increasing numbers of the partisans of black professional baseball—fans, sportswriters, and executives alike—expressed a growing desire for a Negro League World Series. But the one man whose opinion counted the most wasn’t ready—and until he was, there would be no World Series.

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Historian's Corner

Baseball Seals in San Francisco

The 1958 baseball season featured the longstanding Dodgers and Giants, but with one profound difference. Both teams were now based in California, bringing Major League Baseball to the West Coast. The relocation of these teams to Los Angeles and San Francisco, however, was far from the introduction of the game of baseball to the West Coast. The beginning of one tradition typically reflects an end to another.

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