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Articles by Dorothy Seymour Mills

 

Dorothy Seymour Mills, an independent scholar living in Naples, Florida, co-authored the first scholarly history of baseball with her late husband, Harold Seymour. Since his passing, she has concentrated mostly on the history of women in baseball, with three of her books having been published by McFarland. Her forthcoming eBook, Who Ever Heard of a Girls’ Baseball Club? is being published by Thinker Media.

Historian's Corner

Women Can Be Baseball Stars, Too

When Americans speak of baseball stars, they are thinking only of men. But we have had women stars, too. And we’re still developing them.

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Historian's Corner

My Favorite Player: Justine Siegal

Justine Siegal wanted to play baseball for as long as she can remember. “It’s in my blood,” she says. Justine grew up in a suburb of Cleveland, so “I wanted to be Orel Hershiser.” 

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Historian's Corner

Why Can't Women Play for Pay?

New research has shown that women and girls have been playing baseball in America about as long as men and boys. The feminine side of the sport is not as new as most people think.   

Those who discover that women are not new to baseball see this fact as curious but not earthshaking. What they really want to know about is the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) in which about 700 women played from 1943 to 1952 (the one featured in the hit movie, “A League of Their Own”). 

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Historian's Corner

Women and Men Together

Most people think the women of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League of the 1940s was the first and only opportunity for women to play professional baseball. Not true.

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Historian's Corner

Those Nimble American Girls

Throughout American history, girls and women have often been overlooked. “Remember the ladies,” Abigail Adams told her husband. But he didn’t, and they were left out of the most exciting events of their time. 

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