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Articles by Bill Lucey

Bill Lucey is a former news researcher for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale. On DailyNewsGems, Lucey blogs about baseball, journalism, and other topics near and dear to his heart.

Historian's Corner

Historic Baseball Saloons: Relics from a Bygone Era

Distinctive baseball saloons, which once dotted urban landscapes not far from the cities’ ballparks, have gone the way of telephone booths and bookstores.

Some are still around, but they’re falling like dominoes.

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Historian's Corner

Remembering Babe Ruth Day at Yankee Stadium

The National Pastime Museum recently asked its contributors: If you could go back in time, what baseball game would you most have liked to have attended in person?

I put some serious thought into the question. I decided it would have to be a game involving George Herman Ruth.

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Historian's Corner

When Hope Didn't Spring Eternal for Black Baseball Players in Florida

Spring training is traditionally an exciting time for Major League Baseball players. It’s a time for them to get back to doing what they do best: hitting, fielding, stretching muscles, getting reacquainted with old friends, meeting new teammates, and basking in the sun, when others back north are still fighting the last cold blast of the biting winter.

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Historian's Corner

Replaying Volcanic Eruptions from Legendary Managers

With the onset of instant replay in 2014, you would think the number of managers ejected from games would have reduced considerably. After all, with cutting-edge video technology, managers wouldn’t have to kick dirt in the umpire’s direction, rip up first base, or spit tobacco juice anymore; replay officials from the home office in New York would finally be able to answer their prayers.

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Historian's Corner

The Boys of Winter

With the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and Kansas City Royals having reached a thunderous conclusion, it’s now time for Major League ballplayers to put away their gloves, hang up their spikes, and make their winter plans.

Did you ever wonder how much time baseball players have to travel the world, get reacquainted with their families, and while away the hours before packing their belongings and heading to spring training?

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Historian's Corner

Cleveland's League Park

The beginning of the end for League Park can be traced back to November 1928, when Cleveland voters approved the financing for the construction of a colossal $2.5 million downtown multipurpose stadium on the Lakefront.

Ground was officially broken on June 24, 1930; and the stadium opened for business on July 1, 1931. The Indians played their first game at the new facility on July 31, 1932, and wound up playing the entire season there in 1933.

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Historian's Corner

1964 World Series

October 2014 marks the 50-year anniversary of the 1964 World Series, which pit the New York Yankees, the beast of the East, against the St. Louis Cardinals, the beneficiaries of the Philadelphia Phillies’ epic meltdown during the bruising pennant race.

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Historian's Corner

Cleveland's League Park

If you hear a crack of a bat or the sudden roar of a crowd near Lexington Avenue and East 66th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, in the coming weeks and months ahead, don’t be alarmed.

The sounds you’re hearing are radiating from League Park, the former home of Cleveland baseball from 1891 to 1946.

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